Partitioning Large Hard Disk Drives for Use with IRIX 5.X

 
 

Subject: Repartitoning Big Disk

In order to partition a 9GB or larger drive for use with IRIX 5.3 or earlier, you need to configure the drive into smaller partitions where each partition is less than 8GB due to operating system limitations. After you have configured the disk, you need to configure the operating system to be able to access the new partitions. Here's brief overview.

1.) Use fx to configure the disk with a partition table that would look like this for a 9GB drive.

Partition Base (in MB) Size (in MB) Type
0  unused    
1  unused    
6 3 + 4096 efs
7 4099 + 5117 efs
8 0 + 3 volhdr
10 0 + 9216 entire

To Accomplish this do the following:

1)   System will give option to hit escape for system maintenance, hit escape.

2)   5 option menu, choose command monitor

3)   type hinv at the prompt and verify that it sees the disk drive, whether internal or external

4)   boot into fx either from a CDROM or from the system disk

 if booting from the system disk type the following:

>> boot [enter]

>> sash: dksc(0,l,0)/stand/fx --x [enter]

>> follow the prompt after this to reflect the drive you are going to partition

if booting from a CDROM type the following (based on the CDROM being on controller 0 with scsi id 4)

>> boot -f dksc(0,4,8)sashARCS dksc(0,4,7)/stand/fx.ARCS [enter]

>> do you require extended mode? Yes [enter]

>> follow the prompt after this to reflect the drive you are going to partition

5) once in fx go to (r)epartition [enter]

6) (e)xpert [enter]

7) continue? yes [enter]

8) change partition = (0) 6 [enter]

9) part type = (volhdr) efs [enter]

10) base cyl = (0) 3 [enter]

11) # of cyls (max XXXX) = (0) XXX ** here type in l/2 of the number in the parentheses where is says max** [enter]

12) change partition = (7) 7 [enter]

13) part type = (volhdr) efs [enter]

14) base cyl = (0) XXX [enter] ** number here is base cyls from 5 plus max # of cyls from 5 plus one** [enter]

15) # of cyls (max XXXX) = (0) XXX ** number here is the actual number in the parenthesis [enter]

16) change partition = (8) . .

17) // [enter]

18) (1)abel [enter]

19) (sy)nc [enter]

20) . . [enter]

21) (exi)t [enter]

2.) Ensure that the proper nodes are present on the system. If your drive is Controller 0 Drive 3, look for:

/dev/dsk/dks0d3s6

/dev/dsk/dks0d3s7

NOTE: If you specify different partitions above for the two large partitions, then you will need to look for different files in the /dev/dsk directory. i.e.; If you specified partitions 2 and 3 for the big partitions, you would look for:

/dev/dsk/dks0d3s2

/dev/dsk/dks0d3s3

 If the files do not exist, you will need to create them using the mknod command. To create a new device node file, proceed as follows:

Determine the major and minor numbers you will be using in the mknod command by looking at the major and minor numbers for the partitions already listed. If you were working with a disk on controller 0 device 3 you would use the command:

beowulf 2% 1s -la /dev/dsk/dks0d3s*

brw----            2 root               sys                128, 48 Dec 30 23:43 /dev/dsk/dks0dls0

brw-r-----        2 root               sys                128, 49 Jun 3 22:08 /dev/dsk/dks0dlsl

brw-------        2 root               sys                128, 54 Dee 30 23:43 /dev/dsk/dks0dls6

brw-------        1 root               sys                128, 55 Dee 30 23:43 /dev/dsk/dks0dls7

Note that the major number is always 128 and that the minor number is 48+<SCSI ID>. i.e.; Major and minor number for partition 6 is:

128, 48+6 ---> 128, 54

Once you know the major and minor numbers, then create them using the following commands. You need to create device files in both the /dev/dsk and /dev/rdsk directory as shown below for each partition.

# mknod /dev/dsk/dksld3s6 b 128 54

# mknod /dev/rdsk/dksld3s6 c 128 54

 3.) Create file systems on the disk partitions

# mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d3s6

# mkfs /dev/dsk/dks0d3s7

4.) Create the directory for mounting the partitions. I use a naming convention, which includes the SCSI ID number and slice.

 For disk on device 3, partition 6:

 # mkdir /disk36

5.) Create the mount points in the /etc/fstab file to appear as follows:

/dev/dsk/dks0d3s6 /disk36 efs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dks03s6 0 0

6.) Test the entries in the fstab file with the following command:

# mount /disk36

# df �k

 (look to see that the drive is mounted)

Set-up of 18GB on Indigo2 running IRIX 5.3.

Your partitions were configured as follows:

Partition 5 = 5786MB

Partition 6 = 5786MB

Partition 7 = 5789MB

1.) Ensure that the proper nodes are present on the system. If your drive is Controller 1 Drive 4, look for:

/dev/dsk/dksld4s5

/dev/dsk/dksld4s6

ldev/dsk/dks1d4s7

NOTE: If you specify different partitions above for the three large partitions, then you will need to look for different files in the /dev/dsk directory. i.e.; If you specified partitions 2, 3 and 4 for the big partitions, you would look for:

/dev/dsk/dksld4s2

/dev/dsk/dksld4s3

/dev/dsk/dks1d4s4

If the files do not exist, you will need to create them using the mknod command. To create a new device node file, proceed as follows:

Determine the major and minor numbers you will be using in the mknod command by looking at the major and minor numbers for the partitions already listed. If you were working with a disk on controller 1 device 4 you would use the command:

Iris 2% 1s -la /dev/dsk/dksld4s*

brw-------        2 root sys         128, 48            Dec 30 23:43   /dev/dsk/dksld4s0

brw-r-----        2 root sys         128, 49            Jun 3 22:08      /devkdsk/dksld4sl

brw-------        2 root sys         128, 54            Dec 30 23:43   /dev/dsk/dksld4s6

brw-------        1 root sys         128, 55            Dec 30 23:43   /dev/dsk/dksld4s7

Note that the major number is always 128 and that the minor number is the next number after the comma. The minor numbers go up and down in consecutive succession. Just add or subtract from the existing numbers to determine what minor numbers you�ll need for the new partitions.

Once you know the major and minor numbers, then create them using the following commands. You need to create device files in both the /dev/dsk and /dev/rdsk directory as shown below for each partition.

# mknod /dev/dsk/dksld4s5 b 128 53

# mknod /dev/rdsk/dksld4s5 c 128 53

3.) Create file systems on the disk partitions

# mkfs /dev/dsk/dks1d4s5

# mkfs /dev/dsk/dksld4s6

# mkfs /dev/dsk/dksld4s7

4.) Create the directory for mounting the partitions. I use a naming convention, which includes the SCSI ID number and slice; you can use whatever you like.

For disk on device 4, partition 5:

# mkdir /disk45

** do this for all three partitions being used

5.) Create the mount points in the /etc/fstab file to appear as follows:

/dev/dsk/dksld4s5 /disk45 efs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dksld4s5 0 0

/dev/dsk/dksld4s6 /disk46 efs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dksld4s6 0 0

/dev/dsk/dks 1 d4s7 /disk47 efs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dks1d4s7 0 0

6.) Mount the three partitions with the following command:

# mount /disk45

# mount /disk46

# mount /disk47

Then type:

# df-k

(look to see that all three partitions are mounted)

 
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